ATOI

Dale Adcock

Faig Ahmed

Hurvin Anderson

Scott Anderson

Fabio Lattanzi Antinori

Michael Armitage

Luke Armitstead

Lello // Arnell

Francis Bacon

Cornelia Baltes

Simon Belleau

Joshua Bilton

Alison Blickle

Benjamin Brett

Andrew Brischler

Carla Busuttil

Scott Carter

Jonathan Chapline

James Clarkson

Mikey Cook

Kevin Cooley

Elizabeth Corkery

Øystein Dahlstrøm

Blake Daniels

Fleur Van Dodewaard

Tomory Dodge

Antoine Donzeaud

Zavier Ellis

Amir Fattal

Madeline Von Forerster

Ruth Freeman

Anthony Goicolea

Jonny Green

Pablo Griss

Eckart Hahn

Felicity Hammond

Byzantia Harlow

Neil Harrison

Clinton Hayden

Colleen Heslin

Oliver Hickmet

Aaron Holz

Edward Hopley

Gary Hume

Christoffer Joergensen

Tamara K.E

Olivier Kosta-Thefaine

Olaf Kuhnemann

Bruce LaBruce

Janneke Van Leeuwen

Tomáš Libertíny

Gijs Van Lith

Tom Lovelace

Kate Lyddon

Nigel Massey

Roberto & Renato Miaz

Holly Mills

Jenny Morgan

Ryan Mosley

Benjamin Murphy

Jose Carlos Naranjo

Regina Nieke

Sarah Pager

Selma Parlour

Yelena Popova

Martine Poppe

Tony Romano

Lou Ros

Maja Ruznic

Alan Sastre

Sebastian Schrader

Andrew Sendor

Dominic Shepherd

Pawel Sliwinski

Berndnaut Smilde

Evren Sungur

Shaan Syed

Struan Teague

Alexander Tinei

Kristian Touborg

Luke Turner

Alain Urrutia

Dan Voinea

Mathew Weir

Jack West

Jonathan Zawada

Andy Dixon

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Patron's Home (Brooklyn 1) (2018), Acrylic and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 172x120cm
Fox Hunting Painting (2018), Acryliac and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 155x229cm
Parton's Home (London 1) (2018), Acrylic and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 172x130cm
Bacchante & Goat Painting (2018), Acrylic and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 112x170cm
Patron's Home (Brooklyn 2) (2018)l, Acrylic and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 130x130cm
Patron's Home (London 2) (2018), Acrylic and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 172x130cm
Bacchante & Goat Painting (2018), Acrylic and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 112x170cm
Ship Painting (2018), Acrylic and Oil Pastel on Canvas, 172x122cm
Andy Dixon is hyper-aware of art’s relationship with money. Signifiers of wealth abound in his large acrylic paintings, which take as their subjects stately lords, reclining nudes, ornate ballrooms, bathing beauties, and prominent paintings of the aforementioned motifs. Borrowing content from Renaissance art, Flemish still lifes, and Google Image searches of "most expensive vases", his subject matter is selected on the basis of public expectation of what an expensive painting should look like. By sampling content verified as valuable by the market, Dixon positions his own work to ask, "What is the value of a painting of a valuable object?"

Our value of art is truly a phenomenon that operates on a set of rules distinct from the ones that govern the rest of our world. Paintings which feature the tropes Dixon samples from perhaps at one time had social or political agency but are now simply commodities assigned value by the highest bidder. Paintings of expensive things are themselves expensive things collected by the wealthy to promote the luxury lifestyle. However, Dixon isn't out to mock the affluent. Rather, he is a complicit player in the game; his larger paintings of upper class social scenes tend to feature his own previous paintings hanging on the walls in the background. As Alex Quicho writes in Luxury Object, Luxury Subject, “His postmodern non-interest in either vilifying or reifying luxury cooly transmutes its weirdness.” A self-taught painter, he treats his high-brow content in a crude manner, matching a vivid pastel palette with rough line treatment. His practice has recently expanded to include 3D sculptures which mimic the figures in his paintings—absurdly disproportionate, yet still created with an eye toward beauty. In this way, Dixon's own appreciation of his subject matter is evident; and while his work questions the subjective valuation of artwork, it also proves that it doesn't necessarily detract from its beauty.


ANDY DIXON (b. 1979, Vancouver, Canada) lives and works in Los Angeles, California. Solo exhibitions include: ‘Expensive Things II’, Winsor Gallery, Art Toronto (2016); ‘Expensive Things I’, Winsor Gallery, Art Toronto (2016); and ‘Leisure Studies’, RHG, New York (2015). Group exhibitions include: ’10 Year Anniversary’, Joshua Liner Gallery, New York (2018); ‘Art Seattle’, Windsor Gallery, Seattle (2017); and ‘Art Toronto’, Windsor gallery, Toronto (2016). Dixon first group exhibition with BEERS London was in ‘O Canada!’ (2017). Dixon’s solo showings with BEERS London include ‘Pronk!’, Volta Art Fair, New York (2017); and ‘How Much do They Cost?’, Pulse Art Fair, Miami (2017); with an upcoming solo show in the London gallery in October 2018.



 

Andy Dixon is hyper-aware of art’s relationship with money. Signifiers of wealth abound in his large acrylic paintings, which take as their subjects stately lords, reclining nudes, ornate ballrooms, bathing beauties, and prominent paintings of the aforementioned motifs. Borrowing content from Renaissance art, Flemish still lifes, and Google Image searches of "most expensive vases", his subject matter is selected on the basis of public expectation of what an expensive painting should look like. By sampling content verified as valuable by the market, Dixon positions his own work to ask, "What is the value of a painting of a valuable object?"

Our value of art is truly a phenomenon that operates on a set of rules distinct from the ones that govern the rest of our world. Paintings which feature the tropes Dixon samples from perhaps at one time had social or political agency but are now simply commodities assigned value by the highest bidder. Paintings of expensive things are themselves expensive things collected by the wealthy to promote the luxury lifestyle. However, Dixon isn't out to mock the affluent. Rather, he is a complicit player in the game; his larger paintings of upper class social scenes tend to feature his own previous paintings hanging on the walls in the background. As Alex Quicho writes in Luxury Object, Luxury Subject, “His postmodern non-interest in either vilifying or reifying luxury cooly transmutes its weirdness.” A self-taught painter, he treats his high-brow content in a crude manner, matching a vivid pastel palette with rough line treatment. His practice has recently expanded to include 3D sculptures which mimic the figures in his paintings—absurdly disproportionate, yet still created with an eye toward beauty. In this way, Dixon's own appreciation of his subject matter is evident; and while his work questions the subjective valuation of artwork, it also proves that it doesn't necessarily detract from its beauty.


ANDY DIXON (b. 1979, Vancouver, Canada) lives and works in Los Angeles, California. Solo exhibitions include: ‘Expensive Things II’, Winsor Gallery, Art Toronto (2016); ‘Expensive Things I’, Winsor Gallery, Art Toronto (2016); and ‘Leisure Studies’, RHG, New York (2015). Group exhibitions include: ’10 Year Anniversary’, Joshua Liner Gallery, New York (2018); ‘Art Seattle’, Windsor Gallery, Seattle (2017); and ‘Art Toronto’, Windsor gallery, Toronto (2016). Dixon first group exhibition with BEERS London was in ‘O Canada!’ (2017). Dixon’s solo showings with BEERS London include ‘Pronk!’, Volta Art Fair, New York (2017); and ‘How Much do They Cost?’, Pulse Art Fair, Miami (2017); with an upcoming solo show in the London gallery in October 2018.