ATOI

Dale Adcock

Faig Ahmed

Hurvin Anderson

Scott Anderson

Fabio Lattanzi Antinori

Michael Armitage

Luke Armitstead

Lello // Arnell

Francis Bacon

Cornelia Baltes

Simon Belleau

Joshua Bilton

Alison Blickle

Benjamin Brett

Andrew Brischler

Carla Busuttil

Scott Carter

James Clarkson

Mikey Cook

Kevin Cooley

Elizabeth Corkery

Daniel Crews-Chubb

Øystein Dahlstrøm

Blake Daniels

Fleur Van Dodewaard

Tomory Dodge

Antoine Donzeaud

Zavier Ellis

Amir Fattal

Madeline Von Forerster

Ruth Freeman

Robert Fry

Anthony Goicolea

Jonny Green

Pablo Griss

Eckart Hahn

Felicity Hammond

Byzantia Harlow

Neil Harrison

Clinton Hayden

Colleen Heslin

Oliver Hickmet

Aaron Holz

Edward Hopley

Gary Hume

Christoffer Joergensen

Tamara K.E

Olivier Kosta-Thefaine

Olaf Kuhnemann

Bruce LaBruce

Janneke Van Leeuwen

Tomáš Libertíny

Gijs Van Lith

Tom Lovelace

Kate Lyddon

Nigel Massey

Roberto & Renato Miaz

Holly Mills

Jenny Morgan

Ryan Mosley

Benjamin Murphy

Jose Carlos Naranjo

Regina Nieke

Sarah Pager

Selma Parlour

Yelena Popova

Martine Poppe

Tony Romano

Lou Ros

Maja Ruznic

Alan Sastre

Sebastian Schrader

Andrew Sendor

Dominic Shepherd

Pawel Sliwinski

Berndnaut Smilde

Evren Sungur

Shaan Syed

Struan Teague

Alexander Tinei

Kristian Touborg

Luke Turner

Alain Urrutia

Dan Voinea

Mathew Weir

Jack West

Jonathan Zawada

Dale Adcock

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'Lady' (2015), oil on linen, 124x93cm
'Totem' (2014), oil on linen, 260x190cm
'Tomb' (2011), oil on linen, 260x199cm
'Mystic' (2013), oil on linen, 204x126cm
'Stack of Heads' (2012), oil on canvas, 260x199cm
'Untitled Erect' (2009), oil on linen, 230x190cm
'Untitled Sitting' (2009), oil on linen, 230x190cm
'Validator' (2012), oil on linen, 260x190cm
Adcock's paintings are oddly subversive reinterpretations of historical narratives, imagined monuments, and ancient structures. Based on both the artist's own sketches, and accurate historical documentation, Adcock's subject matter includes elements such as upside-down sphinxes, tribal-masks, and off-kilter portraits based on origami maquettes. The works, both massive in scale and housing an astonishing level of intricate detail, are executed in a hyper-realistic illusion of reality, wherein three-dimensional monuments are represented on the two-dimensional picture plane, where the artist relishes with tweaking and skewing the proportions to cause slight and almost imperceptible unease for the viewer. To further elevate this sense of the sublime and uncanny, Adcock's hypperealist style is emphasized by the painfully articulated detail he executes within each piece. While many of his peers chose to celebrate the fluidity, crudeness, or texture of their medium, Adcock's brushwork is so meticulous, labour-intensive, and refined, that the surface of each painting appears flattened and textureless (like a photographic reproduction) that the artist's mark making is indecipherable. Adcock's labour-intensive approach means that he carefully plans and completes 4-5 paintings per year. The painted works are paired with a more fluid and Romantic series of drawings which the artist completes with an almost hypnotic approach that is comparable to automatic-writing.

DALE ADCOCK (B. 1980, United Kingdom) received his MA in Fine Art from the Chelsea College of Art & Design, where he graduated in 2005. Solo shows include Ratio at TJ Boulting (London, 2013) and Chloe, Be My Minotaur at Coleman Projects (London, 2008) London. Adcock has also exhibited extensively in group shows internationally including The Future Can Wait at Victoria House (London, 2014), Perfectionism at Griffin Gallery (London, 2014), The Fine Line at Identity Gallery (Hong Kong, 2013) Alter at Vegas Gallery (London, 2012), The Perfect Nude at Charlie Smith Gallery (London 2012) and the Future Can Wait presents Polemically Small at the Torrance Art Museum (Los Angeles, 2011). His work has belongs to the John Jones Collection as well as the Artists First Management Collection. Further, Adcock is featured in 100 Painters of Tomorrow, authored by Kurt Beers and published by Thames & Hudson (2014), as well as 100 London Artist authored by Zavier Ellis & Edward Lucie-Smith and published by Elizabeth Beecher Publishing (2014). Adcock lives and works in London. 

Adcock's paintings are oddly subversive reinterpretations of historical narratives, imagined monuments, and ancient structures. Based on both the artist's own sketches, and accurate historical documentation, Adcock's subject matter includes elements such as upside-down sphinxes, tribal-masks, and off-kilter portraits based on origami maquettes. The works, both massive in scale and housing an astonishing level of intricate detail, are executed in a hyper-realistic illusion of reality, wherein three-dimensional monuments are represented on the two-dimensional picture plane, where the artist relishes with tweaking and skewing the proportions to cause slight and almost imperceptible unease for the viewer. To further elevate this sense of the sublime and uncanny, Adcock's hypperealist style is emphasized by the painfully articulated detail he executes within each piece. While many of his peers chose to celebrate the fluidity, crudeness, or texture of their medium, Adcock's brushwork is so meticulous, labour-intensive, and refined, that the surface of each painting appears flattened and textureless (like a photographic reproduction) that the artist's mark making is indecipherable. Adcock's labour-intensive approach means that he carefully plans and completes 4-5 paintings per year. The painted works are paired with a more fluid and Romantic series of drawings which the artist completes with an almost hypnotic approach that is comparable to automatic-writing.

DALE ADCOCK (B. 1980, United Kingdom) received his MA in Fine Art from the Chelsea College of Art & Design, where he graduated in 2005. Solo shows include Ratio at TJ Boulting (London, 2013) and Chloe, Be My Minotaur at Coleman Projects (London, 2008) London. Adcock has also exhibited extensively in group shows internationally including The Future Can Wait at Victoria House (London, 2014), Perfectionism at Griffin Gallery (London, 2014), The Fine Line at Identity Gallery (Hong Kong, 2013) Alter at Vegas Gallery (London, 2012), The Perfect Nude at Charlie Smith Gallery (London 2012) and the Future Can Wait presents Polemically Small at the Torrance Art Museum (Los Angeles, 2011). His work has belongs to the John Jones Collection as well as the Artists First Management Collection. Further, Adcock is featured in 100 Painters of Tomorrow, authored by Kurt Beers and published by Thames & Hudson (2014), as well as 100 London Artist authored by Zavier Ellis & Edward Lucie-Smith and published by Elizabeth Beecher Publishing (2014). Adcock lives and works in London.