ATOI

Dale Adcock

Faig Ahmed

Hurvin Anderson

Scott Anderson

Fabio Lattanzi Antinori

Michael Armitage

Luke Armitstead

Lello // Arnell

Francis Bacon

Cornelia Baltes

Simon Belleau

Joshua Bilton

Alison Blickle

Benjamin Brett

Andrew Brischler

Carla Busuttil

Scott Carter

James Clarkson

Mikey Cook

Kevin Cooley

Elizabeth Corkery

Daniel Crews-Chubb

Øystein Dahlstrøm

Blake Daniels

Fleur Van Dodewaard

Tomory Dodge

Antoine Donzeaud

Zavier Ellis

Amir Fattal

Madeline Von Forerster

Ruth Freeman

Robert Fry

Anthony Goicolea

Jonny Green

Pablo Griss

Eckart Hahn

Felicity Hammond

Byzantia Harlow

Neil Harrison

Clinton Hayden

Colleen Heslin

Oliver Hickmet

Aaron Holz

Edward Hopley

Gary Hume

Christoffer Joergensen

Tamara K.E

Olivier Kosta-Thefaine

Olaf Kuhnemann

Bruce LaBruce

Janneke Van Leeuwen

Tomáš Libertíny

Gijs Van Lith

Tom Lovelace

Kate Lyddon

Nigel Massey

Roberto & Renato Miaz

Jenny Morgan

Ryan Mosley

Benjamin Murphy

Jose Carlos Naranjo

Regina Nieke

Sarah Pager

Selma Parlour

Yelena Popova

Martine Poppe

Tony Romano

Lou Ros

Alan Sastre

Sebastian Schrader

Andrew Sendor

Dominic Shepherd

Pawel Sliwinski

Berndnaut Smilde

Evren Sungur

Shaan Syed

Struan Teague

Alexander Tinei

Kristian Touborg

Luke Turner

Alain Urrutia

Dan Voinea

Mathew Weir

Jack West

Jonathan Zawada

Kim Dorland

Inquire about this work

Lost Mother #2 (2011), oil and acrylic on jute, 183x244cm
Fuck Love (2008), oil, acrylic, spray paint, ink and screws on wood panel, 183x244cm
Withdraw (2016), oil on polyester, 152x203cm
Dripping Dream (2013), oil and acrylic on jute, 183x244cm
Ghost of a Drunk (or Self Portrait) (2013), oil and acrylic on jute, 244x183cm
French River (2013), oil and acrylic on jute over wood panels, 244x549cm
Bridge (2015), oil, acrylic, ink and spray paint on linen, 152x183cm
Install at McMichael 2013
Kim Dorland’s works remind us of the power of nature and the impact that humanity has upon our environment. His paintings are typically inspired by the landscapes of his native Canada, as well as more traditional landscape painting and portraiture such as that explored through Tom Thomson, of Canada's famed Group of Seven who painted in the early 20th Century. But what is perhaps most indicative of Dorland's trademark style is a seemingly post-punk aesthetic: like glowing embers from a fading campfire, Dorland's tableaux suggests the harsh burn-out of a long party, a suburban riot, or a torrid affair. Through their use of bright colours and thickly impasto paint, Dorland's scenes often depict a relatively tongue-in-cheek idea of modern life versus nature: graffiti-ridden walls, bridges encroaching into the wilderness, sunrise in suburbia littered with beer bottles, or trunks of trees with expletives 'carved' into their bark with paint. Certainly, there is a sinister undertone to his perspective, but they are presented and levied by their sense of humor and apparent irreverence. Even his figurative work operates similarly, where portraits of friends or family members emerge almost conceptually: often through a vigorously applied mountain of paint, as though the paint were a type of metonym or stand-in for memories. Other times, faces are ghostly, shadowed or obscured behind hoods and blankets. 

Applying paint in a fevered, immediate manner, Dorland uses a combination of flattened acrylic grounds layered with viscerally and liberally applied oils. Lately, his approach combines 'digital painting' with his instantly recognizable style. These are paintings that prefer to elevate their medium - as opposed to their subject matter: Dorland has alluded to celebrated painter Frank Auerbach as a pivotal, early influence, stating he'd "never seen anything like it, the way the material looked and felt. It was sort of icky’. Like Auerbach, Dorland paints his subjects with a sense of freedom from traditional representation combined with an unsettling, almost violent immediacy. Like Auerbach, it seems to provide - for both artist and viewer - a method of exploring humanity and the uncanny while simultaneously keeping it at a curious psychological distance.

KIM DORLAND (b. 1974, Alberta, Canada) lives and works in Vancouver. He completed his MFA at York University, Toronto, Ontario, and his BFA at the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design, Vancouver. Recent solo exhibitions include ‘I Know That I Know Nothing’ at Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016; ‘The End is the Beginning is the End’ at Equinox Gallery, Vancouver, 2016; ‘Everyday Monsters’ at Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, 2015; and ‘I’ve Seen the Future. Brother’ at Galerie Antoine Eraskiran, Montral, 2015. Group exhibitions include ‘Ambivalent Pleasures’ at Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, 2016; ‘25 Works on Paper’ at Beers London, London, 2016; ‘Aidas Bareikis, Kim Dorland & Bill Saylor’ at Mier Gallery, Los Angeles, 2016; and ‘Major Works’ at Equinox Gallery, Vancouver, 2016. He was Globe and Mail’s Artist of the Year 2013, and his works can be found in the collections of the Art Gallery of Alberta, Musée D’art Contemporain De Montréal, The Beth Rudin DeWoody Collection, The Richard Prince Collection as well as The Taschen Collection. 

Kim Dorland’s works remind us of the power of nature and the impact that humanity has upon our environment. His paintings are typically inspired by the landscapes of his native Canada, as well as more traditional landscape painting and portraiture such as that explored through Tom Thomson, of Canada's famed Group of Seven who painted in the early 20th Century. But what is perhaps most indicative of Dorland's trademark style is a seemingly post-punk aesthetic: like glowing embers from a fading campfire, Dorland's tableaux suggests the harsh burn-out of a long party, a suburban riot, or a torrid affair. Through their use of bright colours and thickly impasto paint, Dorland's scenes often depict a relatively tongue-in-cheek idea of modern life versus nature: graffiti-ridden walls, bridges encroaching into the wilderness, sunrise in suburbia littered with beer bottles, or trunks of trees with expletives 'carved' into their bark with paint. Certainly, there is a sinister undertone to his perspective, but they are presented and levied by their sense of humor and apparent irreverence. Even his figurative work operates similarly, where portraits of friends or family members emerge almost conceptually: often through a vigorously applied mountain of paint, as though the paint were a type of metonym or stand-in for memories. Other times, faces are ghostly, shadowed or obscured behind hoods and blankets. 

Applying paint in a fevered, immediate manner, Dorland uses a combination of flattened acrylic grounds layered with viscerally and liberally applied oils. Lately, his approach combines 'digital painting' with his instantly recognizable style. These are paintings that prefer to elevate their medium - as opposed to their subject matter: Dorland has alluded to celebrated painter Frank Auerbach as a pivotal, early influence, stating he'd "never seen anything like it, the way the material looked and felt. It was sort of icky’. Like Auerbach, Dorland paints his subjects with a sense of freedom from traditional representation combined with an unsettling, almost violent immediacy. Like Auerbach, it seems to provide - for both artist and viewer - a method of exploring humanity and the uncanny while simultaneously keeping it at a curious psychological distance.

KIM DORLAND (b. 1974, Alberta, Canada) lives and works in Vancouver. He completed his MFA at York University, Toronto, Ontario, and his BFA at the Emily Carr Institute of Art and Design, Vancouver. Recent solo exhibitions include ‘I Know That I Know Nothing’ at Angell Gallery, Toronto, 2016; ‘The End is the Beginning is the End’ at Equinox Gallery, Vancouver, 2016; ‘Everyday Monsters’ at Museum of Contemporary Art, Denver, 2015; and ‘I’ve Seen the Future. Brother’ at Galerie Antoine Eraskiran, Montral, 2015. Group exhibitions include ‘Ambivalent Pleasures’ at Vancouver Art Gallery, Vancouver, 2016; ‘25 Works on Paper’ at Beers London, London, 2016; ‘Aidas Bareikis, Kim Dorland & Bill Saylor’ at Mier Gallery, Los Angeles, 2016; and ‘Major Works’ at Equinox Gallery, Vancouver, 2016. He was Globe and Mail’s Artist of the Year 2013, and his works can be found in the collections of the Art Gallery of Alberta, Musée D’art Contemporain De Montréal, The Beth Rudin DeWoody Collection, The Richard Prince Collection as well as The Taschen Collection.